April 14th, 2014

At work, at home and on the go, you probably spend hours enmeshed in the Web. Are you spending too much time online?

Take our survey to evaluate your plugged-in time today!

April 4th, 2014

Has friendship been pushed to the bottom of your priority lists? Have trouble making new connections? Tips for making friends as an adult: http://j.mp/1fjX46w

March 21st, 2014

Revolutionary Truth #1: The Way We Are Living Is Crazy.

The United States currently produces more obese, chronically ill and depleted people than it does vital, fit, resilient ones – and this trend is worsening.

Two out of three U.S. adults is overweight or obese. At any given time, half of us are contending with at least one chronic disease. A growing number of us are reliant on pharmaceuticals whose side effects and interactions undermine our health and quality of life

Our children, too, are becoming ill and prescription dependent at ever-younger ages, and their life spans are being shortened as a result. Enough already!

Our collective lack of vitality has become an oppressive source of misery and waste, one that threatens to impede our lives, our liberties, and our pursuit of happiness.

We can change this. We must change this – together.

February 19th, 2014

When testing big assumptions, play it “SMART.”

• Safe (many experiments will involve a certain amount of risk, but don’t devise a test in which the end result could get you fired or badly hurt)
• Modest (start with a small test and work your way up)
• Actionable (make the test one you can undertake, not just think about)
• Research-based (you’re gathering information here, not trying to prove a point, or immediately trying to change a behavior)
• An effective Test of your assumption (one targeted toward gaining better insight into the accuracy of your beliefs and how they do or do not serve you)

More tips on “How to Overcome Your Immunity to Change.

December 17th, 2013
Great suggestions for tapping into — or rediscovering the magic of —the holiday season.
11 Ways to Experience More Holiday Joy.

Great suggestions for tapping into — or rediscovering the magic of —the holiday season.

11 Ways to Experience More Holiday Joy.

December 5th, 2013

Opening your home to guests for the holidays? 

A significant share of that anxiety, according to author Sandy Coughlin, is rooted in self-consciousness. When we host, we worry about being judged. Is our furniture OK? Is the bathroom spotless? Will the food turn out?
Here are a few tips to avoid hospitality-induced anxiety:


Keep it small and simple. People have different levels of comfort with entertaining, says Coughlin, and if throwing a huge holiday bash isn’t easy for you, invite a few friends over for tacos instead. You can work up to larger groups and more complex spreads as your comfort grows. Or not.
Clean selectively. Coughlin advocates for moderation. “You do not have to clean the whole house when guests come over,” she says. “Pick things up, wipe off the counters, clean one bathroom, have one entertaining space that you’ve made comfortable. Then shut the doors to the other rooms.”
Be a connector. Coughlin suggests building your guest list around the idea of who would enjoy meeting whom. Bringing people together who will enliven and inspire one another is the best way to help keep things lively, and almost guarantees your guests will have a good time.
Scale back the self-critique. “People are coming to your home to see you,” not to scrutinize the silverware or judge the wallpaper, says Coughlin. “They’re probably very grateful to be invited over.” When Coughlin attends a gathering, she’s so thrilled to be reconnecting with friends, “the last thing I’m going to do is criticize my hosts’ housekeeping.”
Know that guests empathize. Almost everyone has been in your shoes, so your guests will sincerely appreciate your efforts. If dinner doesn’t turn out or the dog keeps misbehaving, good friends will understand, not find you lacking.

Opening your home to guests for the holidays?

A significant share of that anxiety, according to author Sandy Coughlin, is rooted in self-consciousness. When we host, we worry about being judged. Is our furniture OK? Is the bathroom spotless? Will the food turn out?

Here are a few tips to avoid hospitality-induced anxiety:

  • Keep it small and simple. People have different levels of comfort with entertaining, says Coughlin, and if throwing a huge holiday bash isn’t easy for you, invite a few friends over for tacos instead. You can work up to larger groups and more complex spreads as your comfort grows. Or not.

  • Clean selectively. Coughlin advocates for moderation. “You do not have to clean the whole house when guests come over,” she says. “Pick things up, wipe off the counters, clean one bathroom, have one entertaining space that you’ve made comfortable. Then shut the doors to the other rooms.”

  • Be a connector. Coughlin suggests building your guest list around the idea of who would enjoy meeting whom. Bringing people together who will enliven and inspire one another is the best way to help keep things lively, and almost guarantees your guests will have a good time.

  • Scale back the self-critique. “People are coming to your home to see you,” not to scrutinize the silverware or judge the wallpaper, says Coughlin. “They’re probably very grateful to be invited over.” When Coughlin attends a gathering, she’s so thrilled to be reconnecting with friends, “the last thing I’m going to do is criticize my hosts’ housekeeping.”

  • Know that guests empathize. Almost everyone has been in your shoes, so your guests will sincerely appreciate your efforts. If dinner doesn’t turn out or the dog keeps misbehaving, good friends will understand, not find you lacking.
November 25th, 2013
Gary Chapman, PhD theorizes that there are five ways most people “speak” love. They are:
1. Words of AffirmationTo be verbally acknowledged
2. Quality TimeTo enjoy companionship
3. Receiving GiftsTo be given tokens of love
4. Acts of ServiceTo have their partners do tasks for them
5. Physical TouchTo be in contact via the body
Explore more about the “5 Love Languages.”

Gary Chapman, PhD theorizes that there are five ways most people “speak” love. They are:

1. Words of Affirmation
To be verbally acknowledged

2. Quality Time
To enjoy companionship

3. Receiving Gifts
To be given tokens of love

4. Acts of Service
To have their partners do tasks for them

5. Physical Touch
To be in contact via the body

Explore more about the “5 Love Languages.”

November 15th, 2013

Here’s a grisly riddle to consider: A father and his son are in a car accident. The father dies at the scene and the son, badly injured, is rushed to the hospital. In the operating room, the surgeon looks at the boy and says, “I can’t operate on this boy. He is my son.”

Have you figured out the answer?

Find it, and interesting info on “mindbugs,” in our latest “Big Ideas” on hidden biases.

November 7th, 2013
Scott Adams claims he may be the biggest failure you’ve ever met. Excepting, that is, his little comic-strip masterpiece — Dilbert.
Some unlikely truths that he’s discovered along his rocky path that just might be of use to you:
Goals are for losers.
Your mind isn’t magic. It’s a moist computer you can program.
The most important metric to track is your personal energy.
Every skill you acquire doubles your odds of success.
Happiness is health plus freedom.
Luck can be managed, sort of.
Conquer shyness by being a huge phony (in a good way).
Fitness is the lever that moves the world.
Simplicity transforms ordinary into amazing.

Scott Adams claims he may be the biggest failure you’ve ever met. Excepting, that is, his little comic-strip masterpiece — Dilbert.

Some unlikely truths that he’s discovered along his rocky path that just might be of use to you:

  1. Goals are for losers.
  2. Your mind isn’t magic. It’s a moist computer you can program.
  3. The most important metric to track is your personal energy.
  4. Every skill you acquire doubles your odds of success.
  5. Happiness is health plus freedom.
  6. Luck can be managed, sort of.
  7. Conquer shyness by being a huge phony (in a good way).
  8. Fitness is the lever that moves the world.
  9. Simplicity transforms ordinary into amazing.

November 4th, 2013
The average American spends 33 minutes per day on food preparation and 5 hours and 11 minutes watching television.

(Sources: USDA Economic Research Service; Nielsen Ratings)

The average American spends 33 minutes per day on food preparation and 5 hours and 11 minutes watching television.

(Sources: USDA Economic Research Service; Nielsen Ratings)

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