October 7th, 2014
Kitchen Literacy: 10 Must-Have Cookbooks

After years of working in restaurants and cooking at home, James Beard Award–winning food writer Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl dishes on her favorites.

Kitchen Literacy: 10 Must-Have Cookbooks

After years of working in restaurants and cooking at home, James Beard Award–winning food writer Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl dishes on her favorites.

September 15th, 2014

Kale, Four Ways.

Incredibly versatile, kale varieties can be used interchangeably in most recipes, including these classic, easy preparations from Chef Cary Neff.

August 20th, 2014

Salmon is an excellent source of the mineral selenium and omega-3 fatty acids, such as EPA and DHA.

Recipes for Savoring Salmon

June 30th, 2014
Looking for some creative, simple, and refreshing drinks for the long, hot summer? Try our mocktails! (Tips included for making cocktails, too).

Looking for some creative, simple, and refreshing drinks for the long, hot summer? Try our mocktails! (Tips included for making cocktails, too).

May 12th, 2014

The Healthy Pantry

Stock your cupboards with wholesome essentials and create easy, satisfying meals — fast.

April 23rd, 2014
April 15th, 2014


Summer’s Best Green Drink

One sip, and you’ll think you’re sitting on a beach in Mexico.

  • 2 lime wedges
  • 1 handful fresh cilantro
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • 1 or 2 ice cubes (optional)

Blend.

April 4th, 2014
The Sprig is Up! Long regarded as a ho-hum herb, parsley is actually a staple in many cuisines.
Parsley’s distinctive flavor comes from menthatriene, a volatile oil. Other volatile oils in the herb, especially myristicin, are known cancer fighters and have been shown in studies to prevent tumor formation.
The antioxidant properties of parsley’s flavonoids, vitamin C (alsoa powerful anti-inflammatory), and pro–vitamin A carotenoids help your body ward off many chronic diseases.
Rich in chlorophyll, parsley is a handy breath freshener. Great for toning down  garlic or onion breath.
A mild diuretic, parsley supports the body’s detoxification systems and may help ward off kidney and bladder problems.
Parsley provides folic acid, an important B vitamin that supports cardiovascular health and helps prevent colon and cervical cancers.
Find more information about parsley including some delicious recipes here.

The Sprig is Up! Long regarded as a ho-hum herb, parsley is actually a staple in many cuisines.

  • Parsley’s distinctive flavor comes from menthatriene, a volatile oil. Other volatile oils in the herb, especially myristicin, are known cancer fighters and have been shown in studies to prevent tumor formation
    .
  • The antioxidant properties of parsley’s flavonoids, vitamin C (also
    a powerful anti-inflammatory), and pro–vitamin A carotenoids help your body ward off many chronic diseases.

  • Rich in chlorophyll, parsley is a handy breath freshener. Great for toning down  garlic or onion breath.

  • A mild diuretic, parsley supports the body’s detoxification systems and may help ward off kidney and bladder problems.

  • Parsley provides folic acid, an important B vitamin that supports cardiovascular health and helps prevent colon and cervical cancers.

Find more information about parsley including some delicious recipes here.

March 31st, 2014
One of the first signs that winter is over, asparagus is bursting with powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrients.
Recent research has shown that asparagus contains saponins, phytonutrients that fight inflammation and chronic diseases such as cancer. They also help with blood pressure and blood-sugar regulation.
Asparagus is also rich in glutathione, vitamin C, beta-carotene, vitamin E and several flavonoids that make it an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant powerhouse.
Inulin, a prebiotic, is found in asparagus (as well as in chicory root, Jerusalem artichoke and other foods). It helps nourish probiotic (good) bacteria in the large intestine that improves nutrient absorption and balances biochemistry while lowering the risk of allergies and many chronic diseases. Because asparagus is also high in fiber, it’s excellent for digestive health.
High amounts of B vitamins in asparagus help lower blood levels of the amino acid homocysteine and contribute to heart health.

One of the first signs that winter is over, asparagus is bursting with powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrients.

  • Recent research has shown that asparagus contains saponins, phytonutrients that fight inflammation and chronic diseases such as cancer. They also help with blood pressure and blood-sugar regulation.

  • Asparagus is also rich in glutathione, vitamin C, beta-carotene, vitamin E and several flavonoids that make it an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant powerhouse.

  • Inulin, a prebiotic, is found in asparagus (as well as in chicory root, Jerusalem artichoke and other foods). It helps nourish probiotic (good) bacteria in the large intestine that improves nutrient absorption and balances biochemistry while lowering the risk of allergies and many chronic diseases. Because asparagus is also high in fiber, it’s excellent for digestive health.

  • High amounts of B vitamins in asparagus help lower blood levels of the amino acid homocysteine and contribute to heart health.
March 17th, 2014
Celebrate the Delicate Side of Cabbage this St. Patrick’s Day.
One cup of raw, shredded savoy cabbage provides 60 percent of your daily recommended allowance of vitamin K, which is important for healthy blood coagulation and maintaining bone mass. It’s also loaded with vitamin C, phytonutrients and fiber.
When cooked, savoy’s vitamin K disappears. But steaming or lightly boiling savoy makes other vitamins — especially vitamins C and A — more accessible during the digestion process.
Raw, shredded napa cabbage offers plenty of vitamin C, plus some vitamin A and calcium. The vegetable’s folate, manganese, copper and iron are not readily accessible to the body when it’s raw.
When steamed or lightly boiled, though, a cup of napa cabbage delivers 12 percent of your RDA of folate, as well as a healthy mix of manganese, vitamins A and C, copper, and iron.
The strong flavor of cabbage comes from its glucosinolates, which contain sulfur and nitrogen. Glucosinolates and isothiocyanates are phytochemicals in cabbage that help ward off cancer. By signaling the genes to increase production of certain enzymes, cabbage’s phytonutrients also help optimize the body’s detoxifying abilities.
Raw cabbage juice has been shown to be effective in treating peptic ulcers.

Celebrate the Delicate Side of Cabbage this St. Patrick’s Day.

  • One cup of raw, shredded savoy cabbage provides 60 percent of your daily recommended allowance of vitamin K, which is important for healthy blood coagulation and maintaining bone mass. It’s also loaded with vitamin C, phytonutrients and fiber.
  • When cooked, savoy’s vitamin K disappears. But steaming or lightly boiling savoy makes other vitamins — especially vitamins C and A — more accessible during the digestion process.
  • Raw, shredded napa cabbage offers plenty of vitamin C, plus some vitamin A and calcium. The vegetable’s folate, manganese, copper and iron are not readily accessible to the body when it’s raw.
  • When steamed or lightly boiled, though, a cup of napa cabbage delivers 12 percent of your RDA of folate, as well as a healthy mix of manganese, vitamins A and C, copper, and iron.
  • The strong flavor of cabbage comes from its glucosinolates, which contain sulfur and nitrogen. Glucosinolates and isothiocyanates are phytochemicals in cabbage that help ward off cancer. By signaling the genes to increase production of certain enzymes, cabbage’s phytonutrients also help optimize the body’s detoxifying abilities.
  • Raw cabbage juice has been shown to be effective in treating peptic ulcers.
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