April 9th, 2014
Do you look to sugar and caffeine for a lift? Need ‘em to get through the day? Here’s the buzz on why these well-known stimulants may be more than your system can handle.

Do you look to sugar and caffeine for a lift? Need ‘em to get through the day? Here’s the buzz on why these well-known stimulants may be more than your system can handle.

April 7th, 2014
A 12-ounce can of soda delivers about 10 teaspoons of sugar — more than the American Heart Association’s daily recommendation of 6 tsp. per day for women, 9 tsp. for men. Normally you’d gag on such intense sweetness, but phosphoric acid mellows the sugary flavor.This Is Your Body on Soda

A 12-ounce can of soda delivers about 10 teaspoons of sugar — more than the American Heart Association’s daily recommendation of 6 tsp. per day for women, 9 tsp. for men. Normally you’d gag on such intense sweetness, but phosphoric acid mellows the sugary flavor.

This Is Your Body on Soda

March 10th, 2014
On top of being a big fat ZERO when it comes to raising your blood sugar, fenugreek is crazy, ridiculously good for you, thanks to a naturally occurring compound called diosgenin, which has been shown to improve glucose metabolism, reduce inflammation, and protect against a particularly pernicious form of breast cancer (HER2).

On top of being a big fat ZERO when it comes to raising your blood sugar, fenugreek is crazy, ridiculously good for you, thanks to a naturally occurring compound called diosgenin, which has been shown to improve glucose metabolism, reduce inflammation, and protect against a particularly pernicious form of breast cancer (HER2).

March 7th, 2014

Did you know a serving of Prego tomato sauce has two-and-a-half teaspoons of sugar — more than two Oreo cookies?

Did you know the average single-size commercial yogurt has more sugar per serving than a can of Coke?

Did you know the main ingredient in your barbecue sauce is usually high-fructose corn syrup?

Read more about the role sugar in processed foods plays in the obesity epidemic and tips for “Beating Food Addiction” from Dr. Mark Hyman

January 30th, 2014

Integrative nutritionist Kathie Swift shares her top five recommendations for the FDA’s revised food labels:

1. Position “Front and Center”: Time-starved consumers need to “get the facts” on the front and center of the label so the nutrition headline jumps out at them and influences their purchasing decision.

2. Reduce the seduction of junk food by color-coding the the front of the label with a symbol that indicates both energy and nutrient density (RED = high calorie, low nutrients; YELLOW = high calorie, moderate nutrients; GREEN = high nutrient density)

3. Own up to the toxic ingredients in products. GMOs, colorings/dyes, unsafe additives, nanoparticles — the list goes on — should all be identified on the ingredient label and, again, in a cautionary yellow color.

4. Be sensible about serving sizes. The label should include realistic serving sizes and also dish up servings per container. Some muffins, for example, list 1/2 serving — now, who eats 1/2 of a muffin?

5. Get real. Consumers do not understand grams, so translate them into teaspoons (for instance, 8 grams of sugar equals about 2 teaspoons). Additionally, nutritionists have wanted to expand sugar(s) into natural and added sugar for years. (But speaking of “natural”… to be continued as to how that will be defined!)

January 20th, 2014
Sugar lurks in numerous food sources. Check out the amount in these commercial products.

Sugar lurks in numerous food sources. Check out the amount in these commercial products.

July 24th, 2013
"Guilt-Free Indulgences." The best way to have that cake and eat well, too? Food writer Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl shares her thoughts on making mindful choices that balance health, happiness — and your blood sugar.

"Guilt-Free Indulgences." The best way to have that cake and eat well, too? Food writer Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl shares her thoughts on making mindful choices that balance health, happiness — and your blood sugar.

January 31st, 2012

Cancer’s Favorite Sugar

The average American eats 70 grams of fructose per day — a number triple the recommended daily limit.

April 22nd, 2011
Sugar Shock
"Early humans ate about 4 pounds of sugar a year. By comparison, in 2008,  the average American ate 136 pounds of sugar in the form of white sugar  (cane sugar and beet sugar), corn sweeteners, honey, molasses and other  syrups. That boils down to roughly 22 teaspoons of sugar per person per  day."

Sugar Shock

"Early humans ate about 4 pounds of sugar a year. By comparison, in 2008, the average American ate 136 pounds of sugar in the form of white sugar (cane sugar and beet sugar), corn sweeteners, honey, molasses and other syrups. That boils down to roughly 22 teaspoons of sugar per person per day."

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